Troubleshooting

When running Linux GTK+ & GEF, some elements don't appear.

Linux GTK+ and GEF don't always work well together, depending on the versions used. If some elements are not appearing, disable anti-aliasing in the Apollo preferences (Window->Preferences->Apollo).

The following has been taken from the Eclipse Project Release Notes 3.2.1.

Installation/Configuration issues that can cause Eclipse to fail start

Here are some common problems that can cause Eclipse not to start:

  • Eclipse 3.2 requires at least a 1.4.2 VM. Perhaps an older version of the VM is being found in your path. To explicitly specify which VM to run with, use the Eclipse -vm command-line argument.

  • Eclipse must be installed to a clean directory and not installed over top of a previous installation. If you have done this then please re-install to a new directory. If your workspace is in a child directory of your old installation directory, then see the instructions on "Upgrading Workspace from a Previous Release".

  • Java sometimes has difficulty detecting whether a file system is writable. In particular, the method java.io.File.canWrite() appears to return true in unexpected cases (e.g., using Windows drive sharing where the share is a read-only Samba drive). The Eclipse runtime generally needs a writable configuration area and as a result of this problem, may erroneously detect the current configuration location as writable. The net result is that Eclipse will fail to start and depending on the circumstances, may fail to write a log file with any details. To work around this, we suggest users experiencing this problem set their configuration area explicitly using the -configuration command line argument.

Installing plug-ins by unzipping them into the plugins directory

If you have installed new plug-ins and they aren't showing up when you run, then perhaps you unzipped them into your "plugins" directory and your configuration might need to be refreshed. This can be accomplished by starting Eclipse with the -clean command line argument.

XML files with UTF-8 byte order mark fail to have content type detected

Eclipse will fail to detect the proper content type for XML files that have a UTF-8 byte order mark if Crimson is the XML parser (as it is on Sun 1.4 JREs, but not on Sun 1.5 JREs). This problem will prevent actions normally available when files of the affected content types are selected from being presented to the user. The workaround is to ensure the default XML parser supports UTF-8 BOMs (such as Xerces does).

No branding with old config.ini

If you have an old config.ini file and use it with a new Eclipse build, you may not get the correct product branding. This is because the id of the standard Eclipse product changed. Users in shared install scenarios may end up in this situation as previous builds of Eclipse automatically generated config.ini files in some cases. The work around is either to delete the local config.ini or update the eclipse.product line to read eclipse.product=org.eclipse.platform.ide.

Invalid characters in install directory prevents Eclipse from starting

Eclipse will fail to launch if installed in a directory whose path contains certain invalid characters, including :%#<>"!. The workaround is to install Eclipse in a directory whose path does not contain invalid characters.

Configuration can become invalid when removing org.eclipse.update.configurator

When launching an Eclipse Application from within the Eclipse IDE it is possible to select the set of plug-ins that are included in the Eclipse Application. Removing the org.eclipse.update.configurator plug-in from the set of plug-ins to an existing configuration can cause the configuration to become invalid. This can result in extra plug-ins installed in the target application that are not resolved. To work around this, after the org.eclipse.update.configurator plug-in has been removed, the target configuration area should be cleared before launching.

Help browser tool bar buttons do not work for some documents

The Help browser's Print, Synchronize, and Bookmark buttons do not work for pages that are not actually installed with the product. However, you can always use the print command in the browser's context menu to print the page you're reading.

Help documents not displayed in a browser or very slow document loading (Windows only)

If your LAN settings are not properly configured for local host access, your Help browser might open to a blank page or display an HTTP error instead of a help page, or you may experience long delays when loading help documents. Your system administrator can configure your LAN settings so that help documents can be accessed from the local help server.

  1. In the Control Panel, open Internet Options, select the Connections tab and choose LAN Settings.

  2. If your host was configured to use DHCP for IP assignment, make sure that the "Automatically detect settings" check box is cleared.

  3. If you use a proxy server, ensure that the "Bypass proxy server for local addresses" is selected.

  4. In "Advanced" settings for proxies, add "127.0.0.1;localhost" to the "Exceptions" if these addresses are not listed.

  5. If you are using an automatic configuration script for proxy settings, and are not sure that the script is correct, clear the "Use automatic configuration script" check box.

If the above steps do not fix your problem, try changing the port and host properties on the Help > Help Server preference page. In general, setting host to localhost or 127.0.0.1 should work. Also, especially when running a firewall, you may want to specify port 80 or some other firewall-friendly value.

Help browser displays a blank page

If you see a help launched with a blank page, and no errors displayed, it can be caused by a conflict between libraries in org.eclipse.tomcat plug-in and jars optionally installed in JRE jre/lib/ext directory. To fix the problem, ensure that the JRE used for running Eclipse does not contain any J2EE or Apache jars in the jre/lib/ext directory.

OLE document crashes can cause Eclipse to also crash (Windows only)

If an OLE document crashes, Eclipse can crash, or the workbench menus can become inconsistent.

Crash while editing text on Windows XP with SP2

Some users who have installed Service Pack 2 on Windows XP have experienced crashes while using editors in Eclipse. The workaround is to place a working version of Windows\System32\USP10.DLL in the Eclipse startup directory or uninstall Service Pack 2.

Eclipse does not start on Linux-Motif with Xinerama and a UTF-8 locale

The Linux-motif build of Eclipse does not launch properly when run on a computer with Xinerama (provides support for dual head monitors) and a UTF-8 locale. The workaround for this problem is to change the locale to a non-UTF-8 value, or to disable Xinerama.

Eclipse crashes on RedHat Linux 9 with Bluecurve (GTK+ only)

Users of the Bluecurve theme shipped with RedHat Linux 9 may experience problems running Eclipse. These problems may include crashes or reduced performance. We recommend changing to a different theme.

Eclipse hangs when pasting from an unresponsive application (GTK only)

If the application that is supplying the clipboard material is unresponsive, the paste operation hangs Eclipse for several minutes. This situation can be encountered when copying from an Eclipse target workbench, suspending the target workbench at a breakpoint and pasting into the hosting Eclipse workbench.

Available colors on 8-bit Linux (Linux only)

Typically, in Gnome Linux installs running with 8-bit visuals (i.e. 256 color mode), before the Eclipse application is started there are no free colors. This may mean that Eclipse is unable to allocate the default widget background color, causing it to display a white background. The functionality, however, is otherwise unaffected.

Key bindings can stop working on Debian (GTK+ only)

On some versions of Debian, Eclipse key bindings may stop working. In this context the only way to make the key bindings work again is to restart Eclipse.

The problem is that a focus issue exists in GTK+ 2.6.7 and earlier, for which SWT has a workaround. This workaround is incompatible with the GTK+ 2.6.7 fix, so a GTK+ version check is done at runtime to determine whether the workaround should be used or not. However, Debian backported the GTK+ focus fix into their libgtk+2.0 (2.6.4-2) package, so the SWT workaround and GTK+ fix are both incorrectly applied in this context.

To work around this problem, either get the Debian unstable version of GTK+, compile your own GTK+, or hack SWT's Shell.gtk_realize(int) and change the version that it checks.

Manually installing features and plug-ins on a FAT file system (Windows only)

When features and plug-ins are manually installed on top of an Eclipse-based product install located on a FAT file system that has already been run at least once, the product must be explicitly restarted with -clean. That is,

eclipse.exe -clean

Then, open the Help > Software Updates > Manage Configuration dialog and toggle on the "Show disabled features" button in its toolbar. Select the newly "installed" feature and press on the "Enable feature" action on the right pane (or select the action from the feature's context menu).

Allocating enough memory and solving OutOfMemoryErrors

By default, Eclipse will allocate up to 256 megabytes of Java heap memory. This should be ample for all typical development tasks. However, depending on the JRE that you are running, the number of additional plug-ins you are using, and the number of files you will be working with, you could conceivably have to increase this amount. Eclipse allows you to pass arguments directly to the Java VM using the -vmargs command line argument, which must follow all other Eclipse specific arguments. Thus, to increase the available heap memory, you would typically use:

eclipse -vmargs -Xmx<memory size>

with the <memory size> value set to greater than "256M" (256 megabytes -- the default).

When using a Sun VM, you may also need to increase the size of the permanent generation memory. The default maximum is 64 megabytes, but more may be needed depending on your plug-in configuration and use. The maximum permanent generation size is increased using the -XX:MaxPermSize=<memory size> argument:

eclipse -vmargs -XX:MaxPermSize=<memory size>

This argument may not be available for all VM versions and platforms; consult your VM documentation for more details.

Note that setting memory sizes to be larger than the amount of available physical memory on your machine will cause Java to "thrash" as it copies objects back and forth to virtual memory, which will severely degrade your performance.